How does one trust one’s own validation?

It’s all well and good to discuss validation, ephemeral truths, and unique realities, but how does one square them up to BE a truth? More than A truth, to be a personal truth that becomes the basis for one’s entire worldview? There are few who haven’t had to confront the inaccuracy of “It’s impossible to lie to oneself.” Most of us have had to confront this unpleasant reality at one time or other. Now, it may be true at the deepest levels of a person’s being, at the fragment’s level of truth; however, for Personality, caught up in imprinting, conditioning, self-delusion, ego, and assorted fears, most of us have succumbed to pretzeling ourselves into an image that we thought we must be.

In fact, this is the primary purpose of the 4th Internal Monad–to take the life experiences of the first four decades or so of one’s life and to re-examine them for the truth as it applies to oneself. Who am I? and Why was I born? It’s an arduous 7-step process that usually takes a minimum of several years, and frequently takes a decade or more.  As most have discovered, it’s far more than a philosophical pondering, all four of the bodies that comprise ourselves become involved: emotional, physical, intellectual, and spiritual.  Whoever you thought you were at the beginning isn’t the person you end up being.

Similarly, everything about the 4th Internal Monad is a self-validation process. Everything external and internal goes through the grinder of validation. And whatever is left unfinished when one finally processes the 4th IM, is continued during the interim to the 5th Internal Monad and then through and past that. It’s a process that once started never really finishes. It’s an ongoing inspection with regular re-evaluations of accepted belief systems being exposed and found inadequate. The more that one’s belief systems are in comfortable alignment, the more peaceful the process becomes.

Throughout this is the regular thrumming of the drumbeat of acceptance of oneself. The pretzeling to be someone else to satisfy others becomes impossible. The mirroring of others through a thousand “Me, TOOs” becomes less and less relevant. The need to agree (or disagree) diminishes. It’s not that one DOES agree more, it’s that it’s irrelevant.

But, how does one validate throughout all of the years leading up to this mythical time of self-acceptance and bliss? I think the only method that works reliably is to simply back off of the need for absolutes. Always have a little voice in the back of your mind that is saying, “this could be. . .” or “maybe” . . .or “sometimes this might be true. . .” or “I don’t know enough, yet.” Accept that you need to examine everything a little more in depth, have more experiences, and when all is said and done, whatever you believe right this minute is probably only partially true (if that).

Once you accept that your entire life is a step-by-step process without a single instance of absolute truth, your reality softens to include that others’ realities are equally valid or invalid as yours. Take it from someone who has had a self-karma of “always being right.” That’s a really difficult pretzeling of the mind, body, and spirit. Nothing is more fluid than “right” or “wrong.”

Trust your own validation to be wherever you are at the moment. It will change tomorrow. Maybe.

1 comment to How does one trust one’s own validation?

  • Heidi Hessler

    Beautiful message, Geraldine. I especially liked this part below. This really could help us Scholars out there that compulsively try to analyze and understand everything :)

    “I think the only method that works reliably is to simply back off of the need for absolutes. Always have a little voice in the back of your mind that is saying, “this could be. . .” or “maybe” . . .or “sometimes this might be true. . .” or “I don’t know enough, yet.” Accept that you need to examine everything a little more in depth, have more experiences, and when all is said and done, whatever you believe right this minute is probably only partially true (if that).”

Leave a Reply

  

  

  

You can use these HTML tags

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>